Bleh with Barry

Random with a cynical twist of lime.

Archive for the ‘horror’ Category

Unintentional Zombie-ish Picture

leave a comment »

I know that this is my first post in a while and it will be brief, but I’m sharing this pic with you on here in anticipation of The Walking Dead premiere on AMC later tonight. While this picture is not necessarily one of a zombie, the effect of the poor printing makes this otherwise mundane advertisement a little off-putting and produces a scary looking normal lady. I hope you enjoy.

 

Advertisements

Written by barryr22

October 14, 2012 at 2:57 pm

“The Munsters” Get Revived as Bryan Fuller’s “Mockingbird Lane”

leave a comment »

By CBS Television (eBay item photo front publicity release) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

I love the macabre, monsters, and other things like that. So it will come as no surprise upon hearing that Bryan Fuller of Pushing Daisies and Dead Like Me fame will be rebooting The Munsters (1964) on NBC as Mockingbird Lane. While Fuller himself admits that the show will be a reboot of sorts, he additionally allows that it will not be your parents’ (or grandparents’… I guess some people are old enough…) television show. Instead, the show will act as a revision to the previous source material (no neck bolts, Bela Lugosi costumes, etc.) and will build a new continuity.

If you’re familiar with Fuller’s work, you will know that he has a knack for dark comedy and quirkiness that will be an added addition to the world of our favorite monsters. Moreover, his aesthetic will be wonderful when it comes to painting and creating the world that these favorites of ours will inhabit.  Honestly, I’m excited to see what Fuller does with this series simply because I love his body of work and I loved the original version of the show from the 60s.

Starring:

Herman Munster– Jerry O’Connell

Lily– Portia de Rossi

Grandpa– Eddie Izzard

Marilyn– Charity Wakefield

Eddie– Mason Cook

While some of the casting choices seem a bit odd to me (*cough* Jerry O’Connell *cough*), I think that overall it’s a relatively strong cast. My overall favorite casting choice would be Eddie Izzard as Grandpa. To me, he is the right fit for the snarky and fun character that is Grandpa. . .Moreover, he’s a fabulous actor overall too.

Anyway, here’s hoping that the final product is good. I know that I’ll be tuning in to see what happens. Still, I have faith in Fuller and the cast that has assembled (that feels like an Avengers joke… not intentional… but whatever). Here’s hoping that writing, filming, and editing goes well so that we’ll get to see this new gem in the fall. I await it with neck bared.

For more information, check out this interview with Bryan Fuller by James Hibberd.

True Blood Season 5: Hopes and Thoughts about What is Yet to Be

leave a comment »

 

I usually create one of these posts before the premiere of HBO’s True Blood, and I figure that this year should not be any different than others. I love the Southern Vampire Mysteries and the subsequent television show, which makes me speculate about what might or might not happen. I link you to my “True Blood Post-Mortem of Season 4” to catch you up on my thoughts about the last season. So without further ado, I give you my thoughts and hopes about season 5 (*SPOILERS* from this point on).

1) Tara’s Death– Honestly, Tara has lost favor with me from the first season version of her, and if you’ve kept up with the seasons till now, you know that she filled Eric’s place getting blasted by Debbie Pelt. At the end, Sookie sat holding her dying body and screaming for someone. While they are leading the audience to believe that she’s dead (and personally, it wouldn’t bother me if she was), I don’t think that they’ll actually kill her. I’m more inclined to believe that either shaman Lafayette or one of Sookie’s vampire beaus will save her before she actually fades to black. Do I really care with what happens with her after this? Not really. . .however, I feel that things will still be happening.

2) The Authority coming into the picture– At the end of last season, Nan Flanagan found herself fired for the witch debacle and wanted to enlist Bill and Eric to help her fight against them. However, they killed her and her constituents without a second thought. Still, from the previews and promo videos, it appears that we will meet the Authority in the form of Christopher Meloni, Christopher Heyerdahl, and others. I’m kind of excited to see them since they have been a main focus surrounding the ruling parties of vampires in the series. Vampire hierarchy in novels, television shows, etc. is always something that intrigues me.

3) Werewolf Stuff– As anyone reading this will know, book 5 Dead as a Doornail deals a lot with shapeshifters and werewolves. In my opinion, I think that some of this stuff will come to pass because Alcide is set up to become the new leader of the were pack of Shreveport. I’m a fan of Alcide, but with the emphasis on the vampires, I think that this will become a footnote plot point… yeah…

4) Sam and Luna– This story line should be the most stable in the long run to me. However, I feel like some unpleasantness is going to occur thanks to Marcus’s death… Yeah… I love Janina Gavankar too… So it helps that this story involves her.

5) Eric and Pam’s relationship– From one of the promo videos, I worried about this aspect of the show the most simply because Eric was blaming Pam for unearthing Russell Edgington (which I will get to in a second). Their relationship was on the rocks at the end of the last episode of season 5, but I figured that this would be worked out pretty quickly, yet this turn of events has me thinking that Pam, my favorite character if you don’t know, might die… I’ve said it many times before, but if Pam dies, I will quit watching the show… Yeah.

6) Russell Edgington arises– This might be the favorite thing to happen at the end of the last season. Russell was unearthed, but we don’t know by whom (hence the Pam thing in the promos). With Dennis O’Hare as the delightfully demented vampire of 3000, I’m excited to see him return, which will allow the character to grow yet again. It will be awesome!!!! AWESOME!!!!

7) Off-Bookedness– What excites me and scares me the most about this season deals with the fact that they are going to be almost, if not completely, off book. While it’s been a while since I read the fifth book, I’ve realized since the second season that things are moving away from this canon text. However, I find that this is not necessarily a bad thing. With new thrills and  changes around the bend, I like not being able to see what is coming.

So there you have it, some of the things that I’m excited about for season 5. While I know not all of them will come true, here’s hoping that my radar is right on and at least some of this will happen. If not, I may have to hang these posts up… and frankly, I like talking about vampires, the show, and the books too much to do that. 😉

A Taste of Night

with 2 comments

The end of the world happened March 15, 2042, a rather fitting date considering its reputed historical significance. Late on this day, all the superpowers of the world turned their nuclear arms against each other and fired letting the cards… and bodies fall where they may. What sparked such a response? One can only guess. Maybe someone insulted the American President’s wife? Maybe Spain got tired of trade negotiations with China? Who knows? However, all I can remember is the smell of burning flesh and seeing people I knew and love die painful deaths.

We were in our house when it happened, my wife and I. I sat in the den in my easy chair as I listened to my wife busying herself in the kitchen. It was her night to cook, and I still remember the crunch of the carrots that she chopped to put into the stew she prepared, while she hummed a jaunty tune to herself. As I sat there reading the Times, I remember hearing a pop from somewhere very distant from where we were and thought nothing of it as a result. As I sat in my windowless cave reading my newspaper, I soon felt the house begin to buckle and heard my wife’s humming replaced by a blood-curdling shrieking. I rushed upstairs immediately to see what was the matter expecting that she might have cut herself badly or burned herself on the stove top. Sadly, I was mistaken as she turned to face me, revealing the seared flesh of her face and twin trails of liquid running beneath where her eyes should have been.

I moved closer to investigate and started to weep myself as she continued to scream.

“Oh my fucking bloody hell, what the fuck should I…” I started to question to see what I could do for her. However, the cracking of timber and drywall met my cries as the house collapsed upon my wife and me. And then, all was darkness as I reached and found my beauty in the aftermath.

I held my wife one last time while she slowly sank into shock, and, then, her respiration stopped. Where my beautiful wife had once been, now an eyeless husk remained… An eyeless husk held by myself. I cried tears for her as I lay there in the dark holding what remained… tears of blood, the only kind that a vampire can cry. I held her for several days until the smell of rotting flesh became too much for my heightened senses. I kissed her one last time as I decided to go, leaving her there alone in the darkness and rubble of our former home. The same pile of rubble that I had to push through to escape from the dark and enter the world as we know it now.

At 6:32pm on a breezy, frigid Saturday in New York City, my world changed as my human wife died before my eyes. One week later or at least I assume it was about a week at 9:14am, I pierced through the drywall, timber, and bricks that encased me and found myself in a new world.

The sun still shone in the sky, but a thick cloud of dust and particulate debris now covered it, obscuring the full power of its rays. Surrounding what had once been our house, similar monuments of destruction and despair filled the spaces of our neighbors and our friends. What once was a thriving neighborhood was now a ghost town… or rather the ruins of one. Where green had been brown took its place. As life existed before, nothing but death met my sight. All was silent Human life had existed as the dominant species, now only death and the monsters of the world remained. A world that I was a part of and had been for the better part of four hundred years.

On this end day, the human race found itself instantly an endangered species of sorts with small groups living below the surface of the Earth. My kind would have its era upon the earth. . . my kind would reign. I shook myself into motion and walked toward the horizon, hoping that I would find someone. . .something to balm my ills and make me forget that I am Raymond Rothschar, that I once was married, and now I was irrevocably alone. . .

Written by barryr22

May 8, 2012 at 1:57 am

The Walking Dead: Post-Mortem Season 2 *Spoilers*

leave a comment »

 

By Uploaded to Commons Xeworlebi, image self taken [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

After watching the season 2 finale of The Walking Dead, I come away with many thoughts about what happened and why I like some of it and why other parts irritate me. Overall, I liked season 2, and the finale made the overarching narratives go out with a bang.

1) Zombie blood bath– I think that this might have been the most impressive and exciting part of the season finale because it was the first time a horde of zombies attacked the humans without the humans invading their territory (the tank episode in Atlanta would be an example of territory disruption on the part of Rick and the others). All the characters are able to show their badassness in how they take on the horde as well with many of the more minor characters finally getting some screen time to show their skills (Hershel standing there blasting walkers made it interesting…).

By sookie (Flickr) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

2) Shane’s death via Rick– I’ll be honest that I’ve never like the character of Shane. He was a dick and marched to the beat of a different drum that was going to get the others killed, it was just a matter of time. While I don’t know that Rick stabbing him was an entirely convincing way to waste him albeit a satisfying one, I feel like this  broke the character of Rick from the hopeful one of the group and produced a scary individual on the other side… I’m not sure what is going to happen with him, but I know that Shane did have to die… Lori being pissy with Rick after the fact, however, annoyed the hell out of me because she was the one who initiated the whole situation… What did she think would happen?

3) Jenner’s Big Reveal– I’ve been thinking that there was something fishy with the whole Jenner thing at the end of Season 1 and kinda expected something like this to happen. However, I’m not sure of the consequences of telling everyone that they’re infected. Moreover, I don’t think that anyone had the right to attack Rick over his decision not to tell them… Really? Does it matter that they know? Are they all going to “opt out” now? Frankly, I think that for everyone it was an overreaction because nothing changed except for the knowledge that was passed between them, and besides, Rick didn’t know himself until zombie Shane came after him…

4) Can’t they keep Carl in the f*@$ing house or at least watch him– I’m tired of Carl… He’s annoying, and I wouldn’t feel bad if the character happened to get bit by the zombies (maybe they’d get Lori too). However, I’m astonished that no one ever knows where he is in the post-apocalyptic zombie world. We know what happened when Sophia got away from the group (zombiefied). Moreover, they seem to be trying to make him useful in some way in terms of the story, but I’m still not buying that he’s up and about from a gunshot wound that quickly…

 

5) Michonne– While I’m not very knowledgeable about the comic series, the fact that we get a glimpse of a badass character wielding katanas with zombies on chains behind her makes me excited… it seems that someone has gotten it figured out in the zombie apocalypse and maybe she will help the other survivors…

While these are not all my thoughts about the last episode / season, these are some that still are on my mind and that I hope we are going to get some resolution for (the more open-ended thoughts anyway). What I do hope though is that the zombie-rific action and the human drama (not the whiny kind though… *cough* Lori *cough*) will continue to get better as the series continues and, furthermore, that we will get some more insight into the importance of some character choices as the story continues to unfold.

Written by barryr22

March 24, 2012 at 1:19 am

Carmilla’s Progeny: Charlaine Harris’s Pam as an Evolved Archetype of the Lesbian Vampire

leave a comment »

A paper that I recently wrote for the Spectral and Sublime Gothic Course that I’m in. It deals with the character of Pam from The Southern Vampire Mysteries. I’m interested in expanding it for a possible conference paper for an upcoming Pop Culture Conference.

     In J. Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla, the character Carmilla exists in a liminal space as a lesbian in an era that did not conceive of sexual intercourse beyond the act of penile penetration and as a powerful vampire living off other females in order to survive while pretending to be a delicate lady. Expanding on this liminal model of female vampirism, Charlaine Harris creates Pam from the Southern Vampire Mysteries in such a way that she both parallels and surpasses her limited predecessor. Throughout Harris’s series, Pam expresses her lesbian desires and lusts for several women and, moreover, maintains her femininity even though she too is a powerful vampire.  However, unlike Carmilla who must veil her desires for women and hide her vampiric appetite with odd behavior and secretive feedings, Pam becomes a fully released, lesbian vampire existing in an age after the sexual revolution that can pursue her desires openly. Additionally, Pam exists as a vampire in a world where vampires have made the public aware of their existence and sought to appear innocent through their imbibing synthetic blood. Hence, in the Southern Vampire Mysteries, Pam occupies a space as a liberated version of the Carmilla figure that both solidifies the female vampire model in modern culture but begins to evolve new characteristic nuances that update this archetype for contemporary audience sensibility.

As Carmilla uses her appearance as a young woman to infiltrate the dwellings of her female victims, befriend them, and feed on them, Pam’s femininity works in a similar way to cloak the level of threat she poses to those around her. When Pam is not working at the vampire bar Fangtasia where she wears a mandated black costume, she “dress[es], as always, in sort of middle-class anonymous clothes. . . [like] a pair of winter white knit pants and a blue sweater. . . [with] Her blond hair. . . shining, straight and loose, down her back” (Harris Club 37-8). As Sookie the protagonist of the novels put it, Pam “look[s] like Alice in Wonderland with fangs” (38), which is further emphasized by the fact that Pam is only nineteen years old when turned in the Victorian era (All 90). Additionally, the continuous references to the pastels she wears and the fact that she “look[s] like a vampire cast in an episode of Leave It to Beaver” recur as a theme throughout the series (From Dead 112). By sustaining Alice / suburban housewife image, Pam purports herself as an innocuous that many character in the book underestimate and take for granted as they view her. Furthermore, she upholds the feminine vampire appearance that Carmilla represents as she is able to infiltrate Louisianan society from the rural to higher society circles without arousing a large degree of suspicion.

However, with the invention of synthetic blood and no longer having to feed on humans, Pam’s conscious choice of being an ultra-feminine vampire exposes her agency and exemplifies the strength of her decision making. As opposed to the conception of the modern female vampire wearing blacks and reds and showing cleavage in diaphanous gowns, Pam exemplifies a style filled with pastels, middle-class modern, and vintage chic that emphasize her womanliness.  Furthermore, she wears items like “her pale blue suit. . .a vintage gem. . .[and] hose with seams up the back” to emphasize her individuality and to set herself apart from most everyone that surrounds her (Dead in the Family 69). Even when facing a war with were-witches in which she battles for her life and her maker’s, she upholds this femininity and maintains her Alice image by wearing a “pale pink sweater and darker pink slacks,” regardless of the benefits that wearing complete black would give (Dead to the World 224). By retaining this image of her femininity as opposed to the modern vision of the female vampire, Pam configures herself to be an agentive figure that Carmilla cannot be; whereas Carmilla must maintain a feminine appearance in order to feed, Pam stays hyper-feminized in a world where it is not necessarily beneficial for her in any substantial way.

Although Pam blends in with humanity relatively well, the disdain that she shows for many of the humans that she interacts with reflects Carmilla’s scorn when she sees the funeral of the girl that she feed on and killed. Despite Pam’s amiability toward Sookie and her brother Jason, she quickly shows that “If it came to a choice between upholding vamp interests and being [Sookie’s] buddy” that she would definitely take sides against even these her human friends (Dead to the World 39). Moreover, this fact is furthered by her willingness to kill Sookie and Jason to protect her maker Eric when he loses his memory as a result of a witches’ spell, and she only stops when she realizes that “Eric should stay. . .[with Sookie], where he is [because] Moving will expose him to more danger,” which again puts vampire business above the safety of the humans  (47). Still, while this idea of murdering her human friends shows that she does not hold human life in high esteem, those individuals that she is not acquainted with get her disdain more directly. Early on in the series, she punishes a “lovelorn young man. . .[who] crawl[s] across the floor and kiss[es her] boot” by kicking him away from her, thus causing him bodily harm (Dead Until 106). Thus, Pam upholds a relation to humanity that moves beyond Victorian class consciousness or Carmilla-esque model but changes to one of species elitism that concerns the superiority of vampires over humans.

Even though Pam does uphold vampires over humans, she additionally moves beyond Carmilla’s not “troubl[ing her] head about peasants” and develops human friendships and relationships beyond that of predator and prey (Le Fanu 92). Throughout the course of the series, Pam begins to develop friendships with those that she perceives are not voyeurs of the vampires, such as Sookie and Jason. Pam illustrates this friendliness by opening herself to her tenuously identified friends and shows them her “sense of humor, not something vampires were not noted for,” through her wit and sarcasm (Harris Living 43). Further still, she opens up later in the novels to Sookie revealing the story of her turning and coming to the epiphany that she “actually liked it, being a vampire” as a result (All 89). Pam even comes to the conclusion that Sookie is her “favorite breather” and accepts her as more of equal instead of a useless human (Dead in the Family 193). Thus, even as Pam practices vampire elitism over humans, she arrives at a depth of acceptance for humans somewhat beyond this ideology that opens her person up to a select few individuals and, thereby, changes the perception of the female vampire to a more friendly version rather than the befriend and kill model of Carmilla.

The final aspect of the Carmilla figure that Pam embodies involves her predilection for lesbianism, which permeates her character throughout the Southern Vampire Mysteries. Early in the series, Pam begins to give the audience hints as to her sexuality when she tells Sookie what happened to her after the maenad’s attack: “‘Your shirt was so ragged we had to tear it off,’ Pam said smiling openly. ‘We took turns holding you on our laps. You were much admired. Bill was furious” (Living 44). While she makes light of the fact that she helped save Sookie’s life, Pam also starts to present an overt homosexual nature by smiling at the thought of undressing Sookie. This small detail contrasts sharply to the ambiguity of the potential lesbianism presented in Carmilla. While Carmilla passing kisses and stating that “I have been in love with no one, and never shall  . . . unless it should be you” toward Laura maintains a certain degree of uncertainty, Pam presents her lesbianism willingly (Le Fanu 98). Throughout the course of the series, she “briefly dates Amelia Broadway,” Sookie’s temporary witch roommate, and, later, “takes a human female [Miriam] as a lover” (Koski 422); moreover, she does not date male figures or have any pursued attraction for them whatsoever. Hence, Pam represents another interpretation of Carmilla’s vampiric lesbianism but in a more straightforward way because she lives in a world where female homosexuality exists and is not considered taboo.

Conversely, where Carmilla’s lesbianism seems polygamous at times because of the multiple females she simultaneously feeds on, Pam exhibits a typical version of monogamy in her relationships that distinguishes her from and redefines the female vampire archetype for modern audiences. When Pam has her significant relationships in the series, she stays faithful to her individual partners until they are parted in some way. With Amelia moving back to New Orleans and Miriam dying of leukemia, Pam is freed from any of the conventional aspects of a dedicated relationship. Although this commitment to each individual begins to inform the character of Pam as a monogamist, the fact that she “wants to make another vampire” of Miriam exemplifies this fact even more powerfully (Harris Dead Reckoning 67).  Pam “makes plans to turn Miriam in secret” regardless of the punishment she may receive for creating a vampire without permission but is unable to do so because Miriam dies (Koski 422). Though Pam does sire a new fledgling, the desire itself is a powerful indicator of her monogamous tendencies because the act would have been an eternal commitment between herself and Miriam that she would never be able to undo. Thus, by Pam becoming this monogamous figure as opposed to the more philandering Carmilla, she critiques Le Fanu’s masculine fantasy of lesbianism while working to mainstream the lesbian / homosexual other in a more positive and acceptable way for a modern era.

With Pam’s representation as an agentive lesbian vampire, the Carmilla character she is based on evolves for a new age and is reconfigured into a newer version of this previous archetypal figure. Furthermore, with Pam’s genesis occurring in the Victorian period shortly before 1872 when Le Fanu publishes Carmilla, a succession of the female vampire from Carmilla to Pam is put into place in retrospectively because of their similar traits and tendencies. Through an examination of this retrospective, archetypal continuum, a progression of what it means to be a lesbian vampire is informed from the pre-Victorian through the current day. Further still, the addition of the female author Charlaine Harris writing the precarious lesbian Pam, albeit in the context of a heterosexual perspective, grants the new lesbian vampire an air of authenticity that Le Fanu’s Carmilla figure does not attain. As Carmilla could potentially be perceived as the sexist, lesbian fantasy of Irishman Le Fanu, Harris’s characterization of Pam neutralizes some of the potential misconceptions of the former model and allows the archetypal female vampire to be studied in new ways. Finally, the creation of Pam, a new face of lesbian vampirism, opens the door for future writers to continue this representative progression by reworking and reinterpreting the figure henceforth, giving Carmilla the immortal life of literary notoriety that she deserves.

Romero and Post-Romero Zombies as Gothic Antagonists and the Sublime

with one comment

Recently, in my Spectral and Sublime Gothic Literature class, we had a discussion in which the majority of people agreed that the gross-out, bloody zombies of modernity could not render a Gothic tale because they lack the element of the sublime which makes them the enemy that is foreboding yet one that you want to embrace you in some way. While on one hand, I do agree that in the traditional sense of the Gothic, the Romero-type zombie does not make one want to come to it and be converted into the path of the zombie (unlike the vampire which can be a very Gothic because they are unapproachable and sublime all at the same time). However, as I watched a marathon of The Walking Dead, I came to a conclusion that more than just the zombies exist as the supernatural, antagonistic elements of the show itself that does produce a Gothic tale of sorts.

By Mark Marek Mark Marek Copyright Mark Marek Photography ©2007 URL: Zombie Walk Picture Gallery – Full Coverage with Video on Alberta Stars (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

To begin to deal with my ideology of the Romero / Post-Romero Zombie Gothic, I think that it is important for me to explain how I see the zombies begin to act as a sublime element within the movies, television shows, and comics in which I feel the Gothic exists rather than the norm of just horror. Whereas the zombies themselves are a representation of horrific / gruesome element of the sublime creature / person within a Gothic novel, they additionally represent the figure of death that comes into play in many Gothic tales. However, this death that they represent is not the beautiful death that one may identify with the Gothic notion of the sublime. Zombies represent a gruesome kind of death or undeath because they are not genuinely alive or undead with all their faculties and personalities about them like a vampire or a ghost, yet (and this is where it gets complicated in my mind) in many zombie movies, novels, etc., there is usually talk of “opting out,” as they call it in The Walking Dead.

While the zombies themselves are not what one would call sublime, this natural death to end human suffering in the zombie filled world takes up this sublimity. The humans themselves by “opting out” or committing suicide, usually from a gunshot to the head, create an air of the sublime in the natural death that does not happen as a result of being bitten or waiting to be bitten (cause let’s fact it… it’s only a matter of time in a zombie filled world). The beauty that natural death represents in this isolated and inhospitable world holds a certain air of that sublime that they want but what they are afraid to get because it is suicide. Moreover, this suicide sublimity also provides a stark contrast to the gruesomeness that is the zombie, walking till either starvation or some outside force takes them down. The need to be truly and definitely dead rises to conflict with the zombies.

Then, the nature of the sublime that exists within the modern zombie movie, television show, novel, etc. becomes a triangulation of sorts from humans to zombies / undeath, from zombie / undeath to natural death, and from natural death to

By Mark Marek Mark Marek Copyright Mark Marek Photography ©2007 URL: Zombie Walk Picture Gallery – Full Coverage with Video on Alberta Stars (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

humans. Thought the zombies themselves do not equate a form of death that can be considered sublime, the full equation of death that they and the natural death paralleling them represent the sublimity of the Gothic. As the concept of gruesome death in the form of the zombies overruns the world in zombie stories, the desire to have a natural death without the possibility of a sub-par undead resurrection plays at the corner of the survivors minds, even before a zombie literally plays with and eats their brains.

Written by barryr22

March 8, 2012 at 11:51 pm